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Press Releases

December 15, 2015

Contacts:
Joy Yoo
Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund
202-747-7236
jyoo@apiasf.org

Research Study Finds that Scholarships Have Positive Impact on Asian American & Pacific Islander (APIA) Community College Students

Final Partnership for Equity in Education through Research (PEER) Project Study Highlights the Impact of Scholarship Funding on APIA Students' Educational Experiences and Academic Achievement

Washington, D.C. (December 15, 2015) - The Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIASF), in partnership with the National Commission on Asian and Pacific Islander American Research in Education (CARE) today released "The Impact of Scholarships for Asian and Pacific Islander American Community College Students" report, which examines the impact of a race-conscious scholarship program for Asian and Pacific Islander American (APIA) community college students attending three Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institution (AANAPISI) campuses - City College of San Francisco, De Anza College, and South Seattle College.

APIA college students are commonly perceived as having high academic achievement, coming from middle and upper class backgrounds, and attending highly selective four-year colleges. Despite these common misconceptions, 47.3 percent of APIA college students are enrolled in community colleges, and these students often face barriers to achieving academic success. The report highlights findings of an experimental design study of 366 APIA community college students and the positive impact that scholarship funding had on their academic success.

The report reveals a high level of financial vulnerability among APIA community college students. On average, the students work longer hours, on top of their school responsibilities - nearly half of the sample worked 40 hours or more per week. More than average, the students have a significant amount of family responsibilities, nearly 80 percent of the sample noted that this interfered with their academics. Furthermore, the students have a high rate of immigrant-origin backgrounds and a high proportion are first-generation college students.

The report highlights the impact of scholarship funding on their educational experiences and academic achievement. Receiving a scholarship was associated with improvements in educational expectations. Scholarship recipients were able to decrease the number of hours they worked - from an average of 22.1 to 18.1 hours per week. Scholarship recipients were more likely to utilize campus resources and were associated with improvements in academic success.

"This report demonstrates the critical support that scholarships play in APIA community college students' academic success," says Kimo Kippen, APIASF Board Chair. "APIASF has fervently worked to support the most underserved APIA students, and this research reinforces that we must continue to do so."

"This research is not only important for APIA students, but it also reveals a lot about the lives of low-income community college students generally, and the importance of scholarships for these students. With that said, there is certainly a need for a closer attention to the unique needs of low-income APIA community college students," states Rob Teranishi, CARE principal investigator.

The report is the third in a series of reports that share results from the Partnership for Equity in Education through Research (PEER) project, a collaborative effort between CARE, APIASF and three inaugural AANAPISI campus partners: City College of San Francisco, De Anza College, and South Seattle College.

The full report is available at http://www.apiasf.org/research/2015_CARE_Report.pdf.


About the Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund

Based in Washington, D.C., the Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIASF) is the nation's largest non-profit organization devoted to providing college scholarships for Asian and Pacific Islander Americans (APIA). APIASF works to create opportunities for students to access, complete, and succeed after post-secondary education; thereby developing future leaders who will excel in their career, serve as role models in their communities, and will ultimately contribute to a more vibrant America. Since 2003, APIASF has distributed over $100 million in scholarships to APIA students. APIASF manages three scholarship programs: the APIASF General Scholarship, the APIASF Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander - Serving Institutions (AANAPISI) Scholarship, and the Gates Millennium Scholars/Asian Pacific Islander Americans funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

About the National Commission on Asian and Pacific Islander American Research in Education

The National Commission on Asian and Pacific Islander American Research in Education (CARE) identifies and examines key issues affecting Asian and Pacific Islander American (APIA) student access and success in U.S. higher education. The CARE project is informed by a national commission, consisting of K-12 and higher education professionals, policymakers and public officials, researchers and leaders of advocacy organizations, as well as a research advisory group and a research team. CARE aims to assess APIA participation in higher education across various U.S. regions with consideration for the differences in socioeconomic, ethnic and national backgrounds among these students.