Press Releases

June 25, 2013

Contact:
Tia T. Gordon
TTG+Partners
202-756-4851 or 202-906-0149
tgordon@ttgpartners.com

Katie Tran-Lam
Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund
202-747-7236
ktranlam@apiasf.org

Just When Will Higher Ed. Begin Tapping Into The Potential of Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions?

New Analysis Reveals Lack of Targeted Funding to AANAPISIs
Impact Reach to Large Concentrations of Asian American and Pacific Islander Students

Washington, D.C., June 25, 2013—The number of institutions eligible to be Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs)—a relatively new set of Congressionally-controlled colleges and universities falling under the umbrella of minority-serving institutions—continues to grow along with their increasing positive impact on the fastest-growing, but often the most overlooked and underserved, Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) student population. Likewise, there is rising concern about disparities in federal investments to AANAPISIs that affect the quality of education and access to support services available for AAPI students, and other ethnic/minority students, attending these institutions.

Now, for the first time, a study conducted by the Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIASF) and the National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islander Research in Education (CARE) titled, Partnership for Equity in Education through Research (PEER): Findings from the First Year of Research on AANAPISIs, provides an unprecedented look into the untapped potential of AANAPISIs to answer three critically important questions: (1) How many AANAPISIs exist nationally?, (2) How can promising practices at AANAPISIs impact the entire landscape of higher education?, and (3) How does targeted funding and interventions help tap into the full potential of AANAPISIs?

The report, Partnership for Equity in Education through Research (PEER): Findings from the First Year of Research on AANAPISIs, examines baseline data on the federal AANAPISI program to reveal the regional and institutional representation of these colleges and universities along with their student enrollment and degree production. With the primary focus on postsecondary institutions that are eligible, designated, and funded as AANAPISIs, the study profiles AANAPISIs as being sites for innovation by highlighting findings from campuses that participated in APIASF/CARE's PEER project—a three-year, $2 million effort to help realize the full degree-earning potential of the AAPI student population.

Key Findings About the Growth and Impact of Aanapisis on AAPI Students

In addition, Partnership for Equity in Education through Research (PEER): Findings from the First Year of Research on AANAPISIs concludes with an evaluation of all AANAPISIs' academic and student support services and faculty development efforts to show these institutions' impact in such areas as advising and mentoring, counseling, culturally responsive curriculum, and tutoring.

"The ongoing research from the PEER project provides clear information about the landscape of AANAPISIs and the impact that they have on the growing AAPI student population," said Neil Horikoshi, APIASF president & executive director. "This report helps create a cohesive voice and demonstrates the clear need for significant long-term investments to help ensure the success of all AAPI students. As the fastest-growing community of color, the success of AAPI students and the institutions they attend can no longer be overlooked."

Released today at APIASF's 2013 Higher Education Summit held at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, Partnership for Equity in Education through Research (PEER): Findings from the First Year of Research on AANAPISIs is the first of a series of reports that share results from the PEER project. Forthcoming studies from the PEER project will shed light on the impact of promising practices and targeted interventions that promote access and success for low-income AAPI students.

Earlier this month, CARE released a report, iCount: A Data Quality Movement for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Higher Education, along with ETS, which shared that inadequate data conceal educational disparities for AAPI students. In addition, APIASF and CARE launched a national public awareness effort in March, called "We're the Changing Face of America" campaign, to help increasing access and completion among AAPI students.

About APIASF
Based in Washington, D.C., the Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIASF) is the nation's largest non-profit organization devoted to providing college scholarships for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI). APIASF works to create opportunities for students to access, complete, and succeed after post-secondary education; thereby developing future leaders who will excel in their career, serve as role models in their communities, and will ultimately contribute to a vibrant America. Since 2003, APIASF has distributed more than $60 million in scholarships to deserving AAPI students. APIASF manages two scholarship programs: APIASF's general scholarship and the Gates Millennium Scholars/Asian Pacific Islander Americans funded by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

About CARE
The National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islander Research in Education (CARE) identifies and examines key issues affecting Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) student access and success in U.S. higher education. The CARE project is informed by a national commission, consisting of K-12 and higher education professionals, policymakers and public officials, researchers and leaders of advocacy organizations, as well as a research advisory group and a research team. CARE aims to assess AAPI participation in higher education across various U.S. regions with consideration for the differences in socioeconomic, ethnic and national backgrounds among these students.